Building muscle after 40 (Part II)

building muscle after 40

Although you cannot change your chronological age, you can control, to a large degree, your biological age – which reflects how well you feel, how well your body functions, how resilient you are to common ailments and the overall quality of your life, including continued ability to participate in the activities you participated in when you were 19. The best way you can do that is to work on building muscle after 40.

In Part I, we saw how detrimental muscle loss can be.  But how do you prevent it?  Should you just accept this and slowly wait for your physical (and mental) demise justifying it by “normal process of aging”?

Not at all – sarcopenia may be a common symptom, but common doesn’t mean “natural”.  And although you may not be able to completely eliminate it, you can – and should – have a big impact on its rate by building up (and maintaining, as much as possible) sufficient reserves of functional and strong muscles.

Even though some evidence suggests that loss of muscle mass may affect even active adults, when you have more muscle mass and better muscular strength to start with –you are in a much better position, because you could, technically, afford to lose more without it affecting your day-to-day function (that’s not to say that you should).  A person like Arnold Schwarzenegger – even with 60% loss of muscle mass accumulated before late 20s – will still be much further ahead than an average adult.

So how do you keep (or even start) building muscle after 40?  Let’s look at a few contributing factors individually.

Read more

Fit at 40 and beyond – Part I (losing muscle mass)

Fit at 40

Can you afford not to be fit at 40 and beyond?

Can you still be fit at 40?  How about 50?  How about when you are older?  Not only you can, but you should – perhaps even more so than during your younger years.  After all, science says that by the time you turn 40, your body starts losing muscle mass and muscular strength, as a result of a condition called sarcopenia, or age-related muscle loss.  Annual rates of muscle wasting and strength loss range from around 1% at 40, to as much as 2.5%-4%, as you approach the age of 70.

Given that the overall body weight often does not change (while the body composition does, as it accumulated more lighter-weight fat and sheds less heavier muscle), the loss of muscle mass is often hard to notice – until it’s too late.  That, by the way, is one of the reasons why you never measure success in reshaping your body in terms of “weight” and focus instead on size and muscular strength.

The true mechanisms of sarcopenia and age-related loss of muscle mass and muscular strength are somewhat unclear and probably include such factors as mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, a pro-inflammatory state, metabolic inefficiencies, changes in levels of hormones and vitamin D – but physical inactivity is probably the most important contributing factor.

Read more

10 ideas to increase productivity and get more done

Imrprove Productivity

“How do I increase productivity?”

“How do some people get so many things done?!”

“24 hours in a day is not enough!”

“I’m so busy that I don’t even have time to sleep!”

How many times have you heard people say those things?  Perhaps you are making the same statements and asking the same questions?

Achieving better productivity seems to be on everyone’s wishlist.  But very few people actually get to master the science of productivity and get things done on time and with little stress. That’s why knowing how to be productive will get you ahead of most of them.

Today’s article will offer you 10 ideas on how to increase productivity that you can implement immediately.   It doesn’t matter what you are trying to achieve and in what area – it could be in sports, work or personal life – the principles are all the same.  Make a few simple changes – and you will be amazed to see how much your productivity surges and how much you will get done!

Read more